Choose your color scheme:
The Vette Barn  
 
Go Back   The Vette Barn > Off Topic/Babes/Other > Off Topic

Off Topic Off Topic - General non-Corvette related discussion.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Share Thread Tools
Old 07-16-2020, 7:17pm   #41
Dan Dlabay
Bantayan Kids '13
Points: 18,185, Level: 93
Activity: 15.9%
 
Dan Dlabay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Kettering Ohio
Posts: 7,475
Thanks: 2,578
Thanked 3,587 Times in 1,812 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $874868
Default

Polls are like ass holes every ass hole has one.

TRUMP 2020
Dan Dlabay is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Dan Dlabay For This Useful Post:
Old 07-16-2020, 7:23pm   #42
VITE1
Barn Stall Owner #69
Bantayan Kids '14,'15,'17
GTMS ‘18
Points: 46,515, Level: 100
Activity: 20.6%
 
VITE1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Port Saint Lucie FL
Posts: 32,549
Thanks: 16,390
Thanked 8,763 Times in 4,518 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $1083962
Default

So let me get this straight. The OP is against Trump who is a loudmouth, bombastic arrogant businessman who got more done for the benefit of all Americans in his 3 years in office than Biden did in his 40 plus years in office?
VITE1 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to VITE1 For This Useful Post:
Old 07-16-2020, 7:47pm   #43
bill_daniels
Barn Stall Owner #90125
NCM Supporter '19,'20
Points: 112,362, Level: 100
Activity: 26.1%
 
bill_daniels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Houston, Tejas, Estados Unidos
Posts: 44,733
Thanks: 14,270
Thanked 18,514 Times in 8,933 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $2619337
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by VatorMan View Post
I was on board until you said drain the swamp. Every hire he’s made is from DC or NYC. He is the SUCK as a hiring manager.
He has made some bad staffing picks, for various reasons. Some of it, especially early on, was political patronage, just like any other politician. That explains Reince Priebus and his picks. Trump went all in on generals, figuring they would be a good fit for his pro-America, America first, patriotic agenda....and they were, at first. It was only when it became clear that Trump meant what he said about ending foreign wars, not starting new ones, and withdrawing from being the world's policeman that things started to go South.

Mattis was the first to fall, and he was pretty out and proud about why he quit.....difference of opinion. Trump genuinely wants us out of Afghanistan, there's nothing to be won there, nothing for us. Mattis disagreed, so he left. He lost the other generals for the same reason. Policy differences.

He also has made mistakes based on loyalty. Jeff Sessions? Amarosa? 'Nuff said.

Hiring has been his weak point, and he has drawn too much from the political system he found. It would have been better if he had just gone with a whole team of outsiders like Ben Carson. And he definitely should have blown out every single damned Obama holdover.

Another big fault of Trump seems to be his unbridled optimism. He wants to give people a chance to do the right thing. I think he honestly thought the holdovers, once they saw he was truly working FOR the country, to make it better, would get onboard. I don't think he understood just how swampy things are, how people in government settle into their own fiefdoms.

In short, I think Trump found out it's worse than he thought, and Trump lost valuable time with both bad picks, AND holdovers.
bill_daniels is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to bill_daniels For This Useful Post:
Old 07-16-2020, 7:58pm   #44
Vet4jdc
Charter Member
Barn Stall Owner #78
Points: 15,822, Level: 86
Activity: 0.5%
 
Vet4jdc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Virginia Beach, Virginia
Posts: 3,904
Thanks: 1,058
Thanked 476 Times in 317 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $1004569
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by VatorMan View Post
I was on board until you said drain the swamp. Every hire he’s made is from DC or NYC. He is the SUCK as a hiring manager.
True....he has only made billions by hiring the wrong people.
Vet4jdc is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Vet4jdc For This Useful Post:
Old 07-16-2020, 8:16pm   #45
VatorMan
A Real Barner
NCM Supporter '11,'13
Bantayan Kids '13,'14,'17
Points: 55,652, Level: 100
Activity: 10.4%
 
VatorMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Gaithersburg, MD.
Posts: 20,400
Thanks: 4,818
Thanked 6,901 Times in 3,632 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $1158841
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vet4jdc View Post
True....he has only made billions by hiring the wrong people.
Hiring for .Gov is totally different than business. These people play both sides so they can stay hired no matter which party is in office. Hiring from a tainted pool is suicide.
VatorMan is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to VatorMan For This Useful Post:
Old 07-16-2020, 8:20pm   #46
bill_daniels
Barn Stall Owner #90125
NCM Supporter '19,'20
Points: 112,362, Level: 100
Activity: 26.1%
 
bill_daniels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Houston, Tejas, Estados Unidos
Posts: 44,733
Thanks: 14,270
Thanked 18,514 Times in 8,933 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $2619337
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by VatorMan View Post
Hiring for .Gov is totally different than business. These people play both sides so they can stay hired no matter which party is in office. Hiring from a tainted pool is suicide.
This. If there was a 'never Trumper' resistance working at the Trump Organization, they would just be fired, and that would be that. Can't do that with government jobs, other than the political appointee level positions.
bill_daniels is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2020, 8:39pm   #47
Cybercowboy
2016 Election Expert
Barn Stall Owner #64
Points: 50,697, Level: 100
Activity: 34.6%
 
Cybercowboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Joplin, MO
Posts: 18,236
Thanks: 999
Thanked 10,152 Times in 4,727 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $11380138
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bill_daniels View Post
He has made some bad staffing picks, for various reasons. Some of it, especially early on, was political patronage, just like any other politician. That explains Reince Priebus and his picks. Trump went all in on generals, figuring they would be a good fit for his pro-America, America first, patriotic agenda....and they were, at first. It was only when it became clear that Trump meant what he said about ending foreign wars, not starting new ones, and withdrawing from being the world's policeman that things started to go South.

Mattis was the first to fall, and he was pretty out and proud about why he quit.....difference of opinion. Trump genuinely wants us out of Afghanistan, there's nothing to be won there, nothing for us. Mattis disagreed, so he left. He lost the other generals for the same reason. Policy differences.

He also has made mistakes based on loyalty. Jeff Sessions? Amarosa? 'Nuff said.

Hiring has been his weak point, and he has drawn too much from the political system he found. It would have been better if he had just gone with a whole team of outsiders like Ben Carson. And he definitely should have blown out every single damned Obama holdover.

Another big fault of Trump seems to be his unbridled optimism. He wants to give people a chance to do the right thing. I think he honestly thought the holdovers, once they saw he was truly working FOR the country, to make it better, would get onboard. I don't think he understood just how swampy things are, how people in government settle into their own fiefdoms.

In short, I think Trump found out it's worse than he thought, and Trump lost valuable time with both bad picks, AND holdovers.
I mean you can exactly nail it I guess, but I was hoping for more nuance and obfuscation. Way to tell them what happened exactly Bill, you right wing

Bill, wait until they find out how you get power in DC, and it involves blackmail. Think they will call us conspiracy types? Asking for a friend.
Cybercowboy is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Cybercowboy For This Useful Post:
Old 07-16-2020, 11:34pm   #48
SQUIRMIN VERMIN 84
Barn Stall Owner #49
Points: 18,935, Level: 95
Activity: 5.2%
 
SQUIRMIN VERMIN 84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: People's Kollektive of Seattle
Posts: 20,466
Thanks: 15,747
Thanked 3,459 Times in 1,851 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $1024930
Default

I've never put much stock in polls. The way I see it, whether the polls are
taken on the phone or at the front door, Conservatives are less likely to divulge
opinions to strangers while Libtards can't wait to spill their guts to anyone because,
well they know everything. Ask them. Hence a skewed poll is given.

All the later 2016 "polls" taken showed Hitlerry winning because these fuktards finally
started believing their own bullshit!
Just my own take on it.
SQUIRMIN VERMIN 84 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to SQUIRMIN VERMIN 84 For This Useful Post:
Old 07-17-2020, 5:14am   #49
carlton_fritz
Barn Stall Owner #1991
Bantayan Kids '13
Points: 59,016, Level: 100
Activity: 23.1%
 
carlton_fritz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Brains and bewbs. The motherload.
Posts: 32,338
Thanks: 13,956
Thanked 4,998 Times in 2,886 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $48100236
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve_R View Post
How many times have you been banned here?

Not enough.
carlton_fritz is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to carlton_fritz For This Useful Post:
Old 07-17-2020, 5:20am   #50
carlton_fritz
Barn Stall Owner #1991
Bantayan Kids '13
Points: 59,016, Level: 100
Activity: 23.1%
 
carlton_fritz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Brains and bewbs. The motherload.
Posts: 32,338
Thanks: 13,956
Thanked 4,998 Times in 2,886 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $48100236
Default

Biden is just a person for the DNC until they can spring Mike Obama on us.
carlton_fritz is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to carlton_fritz For This Useful Post:
Old 07-17-2020, 12:33pm   #51
MrPeabody
A Real Barner
Points: 61,999, Level: 100
Activity: 0%
 
MrPeabody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 34,306
Thanks: 14,294
Thanked 12,279 Times in 5,938 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $2214585
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SQUIRMIN VERMIN 84 View Post
I've never put much stock in polls. The way I see it, whether the polls are
taken on the phone or at the front door, Conservatives are less likely to divulge
opinions to strangers while Libtards can't wait to spill their guts to anyone because,
well they know everything. Ask them. Hence a skewed poll is given.


All the later 2016 "polls" taken showed Hitlerry winning because these fuktards finally
started believing their own bullshit!
Just my own take on it.
Which side is walking around with red hats to identify themselves and their political opinions to every one who sees them? NTTAWWT
MrPeabody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2020, 12:35pm   #52
The_Dude
Bantayan Kids '14
Points: 25,496, Level: 100
Activity: 61.8%
 
The_Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Oregon
Posts: 34,708
Thanks: 28,470
Thanked 6,635 Times in 2,754 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $505033
Default

A lot can happen in four months.
The_Dude is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to The_Dude For This Useful Post:
Old 07-17-2020, 1:07pm   #53
SQUIRMIN VERMIN 84
Barn Stall Owner #49
Points: 18,935, Level: 95
Activity: 5.2%
 
SQUIRMIN VERMIN 84's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: People's Kollektive of Seattle
Posts: 20,466
Thanks: 15,747
Thanked 3,459 Times in 1,851 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $1024930
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPeabody View Post
Which side is walking around with red hats to identify themselves and their political opinions to every one who sees them? NTTAWWT
Point well taken MrP, but I believe those red hats are more for identifying as
fellow conservatives in an attempt for unity with other believers.

Much like hoodies and BLM shirts and bricks the left use for the same reason.
SQUIRMIN VERMIN 84 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to SQUIRMIN VERMIN 84 For This Useful Post:
Old 07-17-2020, 1:33pm   #54
bill_daniels
Barn Stall Owner #90125
NCM Supporter '19,'20
Points: 112,362, Level: 100
Activity: 26.1%
 
bill_daniels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Houston, Tejas, Estados Unidos
Posts: 44,733
Thanks: 14,270
Thanked 18,514 Times in 8,933 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $2619337
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SQUIRMIN VERMIN 84 View Post
Point well taken MrP, but I believe those red hats are more for identifying as
fellow conservatives in an attempt for unity with other believers.

Much like hoodies and BLM shirts and bricks the left use for the same reason.
Don't forget about face tattoos.......



bill_daniels is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to bill_daniels For This Useful Post:
Old 07-17-2020, 1:54pm   #55
snide
Potnonomicaphobe
Barn Raising II,III
NCM Supporter '13
Bantayan Kids '17
Points: 99,710, Level: 100
Activity: 99.4%
 
snide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: I could never live there.
Posts: 107,522
Thanks: 76,666
Thanked 17,419 Times in 8,579 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $109031851
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Dude View Post
A lot can happen in four months.
Where's @Bingo Fuel to help us get through?
snide is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to snide For This Useful Post:
Old 07-17-2020, 2:01pm   #56
Steve_R
A Real Barner
Points: 20,378, Level: 98
Activity: 99.0%
 
Steve_R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: On the beach
Posts: 7,520
Thanks: 3,133
Thanked 9,189 Times in 3,250 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $1022656
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by snide View Post
Where's @Bingo Fuel to help us get through?

Haven't seen him here or over there for a long time.
Steve_R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2020, 2:16pm   #57
Jeff '79
Barn Stall Owner #2112
Fantasy Football Champ '14,'16
Bantayan Kids '13
Points: 132,870, Level: 100
Activity: 99.5%
 
Jeff '79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: WHERE I LAY MY HEAD IS HOME - REHO BEACH DELAWARE
Posts: 41,460
Thanks: 6,182
Thanked 10,229 Times in 6,145 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $3042953
Default

I really don't care about your opinions of this article or its source.
This is EXACTLY what me and many fellow Americans, many of whom including me who voted for Trump, now feel.
You can talk up Trump til you're blue in the face, but he's out of my wheelhouse and no, I will not vote for him again.
btw... falsehoods means lies. If you read nothing, read the bolded part for the cliffs.

Have a nice read,

Over the course of 72 hours, President Donald Trump’s campaign accused Joe Biden of plagiarism. Trump warned that a Biden presidency would lead to a surge of crime in the streets. He tried to link his opponent to socialism and to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a leader of the Democratic left. And he said that Biden would eliminate the suburbs — and windows.

Facing weak poll numbers and criticism for failing to offer a second-term agenda or a cohesive case against Biden, the president is accelerating his attacks on his Democratic opponent — a sign of nervousness for any incumbent — as he looks for a way to turn the corner for his struggling candidacy. He has shaken up his campaign staff and intensified a tear-down operation aimed at Biden with a dizzying barrage of attacks, highlighted by dark, and at times misleading, television ads.

Deprived of his favored forum of raucous campaign rallies because of the coronavirus pandemic, Trump has road-tested his messages in the Rose Garden, at a staid appearance in Atlanta to announce rollbacks of environmental regulations and on Twitter, supplying an onslaught of scattershot and sometimes contradictory criticisms of the former vice president.

“It’s definitely a step in the right direction,” said Neil Newhouse, a Republican pollster. He noted that the contest had focused on the president’s record and conduct for months, and that the Trump campaign needed to begin “reminding people that this is a choice election, and beginning to frame up what that decision entails.”

Trump and his political team have tried new lines of attack before, including mocking Biden’s mental faculties, portraying him as corrupt and arguing that he is too cozy with China — none of which reversed Trump’s slide in the polls.

The president’s lack of discipline is a caution against any Republican hopes that this might be the start of a new chapter. The latest attacks on Biden may not work with undecided voters who have relatively positive views about him and his moderate political message, and are unhappy with Trump’s performance. The president's record of falsehoods, some strategists said, undercut his credibility with the American public over the past four years, and thus his ability to deliver effective criticism of Biden.

Aides to Trump said he has become increasingly aware of his peril and has leaned even more into the day-to-day operations of his campaign. The latest evidence of that was his decision Wednesday night to remove Brad Parscale as his campaign manager and to replace him with Bill Stepien, the deputy. Stepien is close to Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser, who has been put firmly at the helm of the reelection effort.

The new stance could represent a calculated effort by a campaign looking for a reset before it is too late. There is a long history of presidents using this period before Labor Day to set the framework of the race, and to negatively define their opponents; Trump has been under criticism from Republicans for his failure to do that.

The president’s actions this week drew some applause from Republicans who had grown despondent at the drift, and some party strategists expressed hope that this might one day be remembered as a turning point for Trump’s struggling campaign.

But there’s skepticism among Republicans and Democrats that Trump can reverse his troubled political trajectory. Beyond the overwhelming problems from the pandemic, the president lacks any kind of strategy to win over voters who are not already part of his right-wing base — or even, apparently, the will to do so — and his polarizing style has left him viewed unfavorably by much of the country, including in some traditionally Republican strongholds.

The broad and random nature of his attacks against Biden over the past few days suggest that Trump, unlike George H.W. Bush in 1988 and George W. Bush in 2004, has not engaged in the kind of methodical research that can identify the best lines of attack against an opponent. In Philadelphia this week, Trump ran television advertisements that accused Biden of both being soft on crime and being too tough on crime.

“If you go back to President Bush and President Obama, they effectively already had a bead on their opponent, a cleareyed strategy of what they were going to attack on, how they were going to frame it and how to make the election a binary choice,” said Rahm Emanuel, a Democrat who served as chief of staff to President Barack Obama and as mayor of Chicago. “That was a year and a half out. This is four months out. Trump is still trying to figure out how to get his handle on Joe Biden.”

Trump’s impulsive style of campaigning must be taken into account as well, strategists from both parties said.

“We shouldn’t overthink any of this as a strategy,” said Kevin Madden, who was a senior adviser to Mitt Romney, the Republican candidate for president in 2012. “It’s all the reflexive action of a candidate reacting to the hourly news cycle and trying to program it.”

Another indicator of Trump’s difficult path is the number of people who, in several polls, say the country is going in the right direction. That percentage is generally only in the high teens or just above 20%, numbers that reveal an unhappy electorate under Trump’s stewardship.

Trump’s newly intensified efforts to define Biden pose a strategic challenge to the Biden campaign in determining how — or if — to respond.

Biden’s aides and allies argued that Trump had so many vulnerabilities that he was limited in what kind of attacks he could make. They said they would be selective in deciding when to respond, looking for ways to advance their own message while trying to avoid elevating false claims.

“Donald Trump has spent his entire life depending on wild-eyed lies and asinine conspiracy theories to distract from his own failures and wrongdoing,” said Andrew Bates, a spokesman for Biden. “We starve Trump of the engagement that he wants and then pounce when he shows his underbelly.”

From this perspective, Trump has become so discredited with much of the American public that many of the attacks will come across as desperate.

“If you don’t know what sticks by now, it’s too late,” said Stephanie Cutter, a Democratic consultant who is helping to oversee the nominating convention for Biden. “When your opponent is throwing spaghetti to the wall to see what sticks, you don’t respond, you stick to your own strategy.”

“These attacks are not convincing for anybody on the fence,” she said. “For the Democratic base, and anybody on the fence who may have voted for Trump, these attacks are not what the race is about. It’s not about socialism, it’s not about defunding the police, it’s not about Bernie Sanders. It’s about moving this country away from the chaos and corruption of the last four years.”

But Democrats and Biden’s aides are well aware of the history of presidential candidates who ignored attacks they thought were specious and then lost the election — like John Kerry, in 2004, and Michael Dukakis, in 1988, both Democrats.

A claim that Biden supports efforts like those to defund the police, some Democrats said, could prove to be potent with at least a slice of voters and was worth watching, even though Biden has said repeatedly that he opposes defunding the police.

In recent weeks, two of Biden’s top advisers — Steve Ricchetti and Rep. Cedric Richmond of Louisiana — have set up Zoom meetings with Democratic congressional delegations in key battleground states. It’s an effort to open conversations with key leaders on the ground who can also serve as an early warning system if Trump’s attacks are getting traction, some participants said.

If necessary, Biden could move to rebut some of Trump’s attacks; he could also try to change the subject by mounting his new attacks on Trump, reflecting the adage in politics that a candidate who is defending is a candidate who is losing.

“They’re setting up very strong lines of communication,” said Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich. “If somebody does get worried, they’re hearing it, paying attention. They were really clear about that: They want to have those lines of communication open.”

Dingell said she has warned the Biden campaign that the Trump campaign’s most searing attacks cannot go unanswered.

“He is clearly playing ads that are wedge issues, and we have to be prepared to answer them, which we didn’t four years ago,” she said, pointing to trade, an issue of particular importance to autoworkers in her state. “We’re doing better than I thought we might be at this point, but the election is still three months away and we have to be prepared.”

Biden’s team has been through clashes with Trump before — such as last fall, when the president laced into the former vice president’s son, Hunter, criticizing his work for a Ukrainian energy company. At the time, the campaign struggled to form a forceful response, paralyzed by indecision.

Since then, advisers and allies say, they have honed a playbook of sorts, reflecting a growing understanding of how to be nimble and challenge apresident who is capable of drawing significant attention to his slashing attacks.

The best approach, said Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, is, “kind of letting him flail around, but there’s always, within those tracks, opportunities to hit back. And I think they’ve been doing it.”

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.
Jeff '79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2020, 2:21pm   #58
Sea Six
Barn Stall Owner #16A
Barn Stall Owner #16B

NCM Supporter '11,'13
Bantayan Kids '13
Points: 144,596, Level: 100
Activity: 4.3%
 
Sea Six's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: NW FL
Posts: 50,534
Thanks: 9,797
Thanked 12,475 Times in 7,090 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $602728
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff '79 View Post
I really don't care about your opinions of this article or its source.
This is EXACTLY what me and many fellow Americans, many of whom including me who voted for Trump, now feel.
You can talk up Trump til you're blue in the face, but he's out of my wheelhouse and no, I will not vote for him again.
btw... falsehoods means lies. If you read nothing, read the bolded part for the cliffs.

Have a nice read,

Over the course of 72 hours, President Donald Trump’s campaign accused Joe Biden of plagiarism. Trump warned that a Biden presidency would lead to a surge of crime in the streets. He tried to link his opponent to socialism and to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a leader of the Democratic left. And he said that Biden would eliminate the suburbs — and windows.

Facing weak poll numbers and criticism for failing to offer a second-term agenda or a cohesive case against Biden, the president is accelerating his attacks on his Democratic opponent — a sign of nervousness for any incumbent — as he looks for a way to turn the corner for his struggling candidacy. He has shaken up his campaign staff and intensified a tear-down operation aimed at Biden with a dizzying barrage of attacks, highlighted by dark, and at times misleading, television ads.

Deprived of his favored forum of raucous campaign rallies because of the coronavirus pandemic, Trump has road-tested his messages in the Rose Garden, at a staid appearance in Atlanta to announce rollbacks of environmental regulations and on Twitter, supplying an onslaught of scattershot and sometimes contradictory criticisms of the former vice president.

“It’s definitely a step in the right direction,” said Neil Newhouse, a Republican pollster. He noted that the contest had focused on the president’s record and conduct for months, and that the Trump campaign needed to begin “reminding people that this is a choice election, and beginning to frame up what that decision entails.”

Trump and his political team have tried new lines of attack before, including mocking Biden’s mental faculties, portraying him as corrupt and arguing that he is too cozy with China — none of which reversed Trump’s slide in the polls.

The president’s lack of discipline is a caution against any Republican hopes that this might be the start of a new chapter. The latest attacks on Biden may not work with undecided voters who have relatively positive views about him and his moderate political message, and are unhappy with Trump’s performance. The president's record of falsehoods, some strategists said, undercut his credibility with the American public over the past four years, and thus his ability to deliver effective criticism of Biden.

Aides to Trump said he has become increasingly aware of his peril and has leaned even more into the day-to-day operations of his campaign. The latest evidence of that was his decision Wednesday night to remove Brad Parscale as his campaign manager and to replace him with Bill Stepien, the deputy. Stepien is close to Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser, who has been put firmly at the helm of the reelection effort.

The new stance could represent a calculated effort by a campaign looking for a reset before it is too late. There is a long history of presidents using this period before Labor Day to set the framework of the race, and to negatively define their opponents; Trump has been under criticism from Republicans for his failure to do that.

The president’s actions this week drew some applause from Republicans who had grown despondent at the drift, and some party strategists expressed hope that this might one day be remembered as a turning point for Trump’s struggling campaign.

But there’s skepticism among Republicans and Democrats that Trump can reverse his troubled political trajectory. Beyond the overwhelming problems from the pandemic, the president lacks any kind of strategy to win over voters who are not already part of his right-wing base — or even, apparently, the will to do so — and his polarizing style has left him viewed unfavorably by much of the country, including in some traditionally Republican strongholds.

The broad and random nature of his attacks against Biden over the past few days suggest that Trump, unlike George H.W. Bush in 1988 and George W. Bush in 2004, has not engaged in the kind of methodical research that can identify the best lines of attack against an opponent. In Philadelphia this week, Trump ran television advertisements that accused Biden of both being soft on crime and being too tough on crime.

“If you go back to President Bush and President Obama, they effectively already had a bead on their opponent, a cleareyed strategy of what they were going to attack on, how they were going to frame it and how to make the election a binary choice,” said Rahm Emanuel, a Democrat who served as chief of staff to President Barack Obama and as mayor of Chicago. “That was a year and a half out. This is four months out. Trump is still trying to figure out how to get his handle on Joe Biden.”

Trump’s impulsive style of campaigning must be taken into account as well, strategists from both parties said.

“We shouldn’t overthink any of this as a strategy,” said Kevin Madden, who was a senior adviser to Mitt Romney, the Republican candidate for president in 2012. “It’s all the reflexive action of a candidate reacting to the hourly news cycle and trying to program it.”

Another indicator of Trump’s difficult path is the number of people who, in several polls, say the country is going in the right direction. That percentage is generally only in the high teens or just above 20%, numbers that reveal an unhappy electorate under Trump’s stewardship.

Trump’s newly intensified efforts to define Biden pose a strategic challenge to the Biden campaign in determining how — or if — to respond.

Biden’s aides and allies argued that Trump had so many vulnerabilities that he was limited in what kind of attacks he could make. They said they would be selective in deciding when to respond, looking for ways to advance their own message while trying to avoid elevating false claims.

“Donald Trump has spent his entire life depending on wild-eyed lies and asinine conspiracy theories to distract from his own failures and wrongdoing,” said Andrew Bates, a spokesman for Biden. “We starve Trump of the engagement that he wants and then pounce when he shows his underbelly.”

From this perspective, Trump has become so discredited with much of the American public that many of the attacks will come across as desperate.

“If you don’t know what sticks by now, it’s too late,” said Stephanie Cutter, a Democratic consultant who is helping to oversee the nominating convention for Biden. “When your opponent is throwing spaghetti to the wall to see what sticks, you don’t respond, you stick to your own strategy.”

“These attacks are not convincing for anybody on the fence,” she said. “For the Democratic base, and anybody on the fence who may have voted for Trump, these attacks are not what the race is about. It’s not about socialism, it’s not about defunding the police, it’s not about Bernie Sanders. It’s about moving this country away from the chaos and corruption of the last four years.”

But Democrats and Biden’s aides are well aware of the history of presidential candidates who ignored attacks they thought were specious and then lost the election — like John Kerry, in 2004, and Michael Dukakis, in 1988, both Democrats.

A claim that Biden supports efforts like those to defund the police, some Democrats said, could prove to be potent with at least a slice of voters and was worth watching, even though Biden has said repeatedly that he opposes defunding the police.

In recent weeks, two of Biden’s top advisers — Steve Ricchetti and Rep. Cedric Richmond of Louisiana — have set up Zoom meetings with Democratic congressional delegations in key battleground states. It’s an effort to open conversations with key leaders on the ground who can also serve as an early warning system if Trump’s attacks are getting traction, some participants said.

If necessary, Biden could move to rebut some of Trump’s attacks; he could also try to change the subject by mounting his new attacks on Trump, reflecting the adage in politics that a candidate who is defending is a candidate who is losing.

“They’re setting up very strong lines of communication,” said Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich. “If somebody does get worried, they’re hearing it, paying attention. They were really clear about that: They want to have those lines of communication open.”

Dingell said she has warned the Biden campaign that the Trump campaign’s most searing attacks cannot go unanswered.

“He is clearly playing ads that are wedge issues, and we have to be prepared to answer them, which we didn’t four years ago,” she said, pointing to trade, an issue of particular importance to autoworkers in her state. “We’re doing better than I thought we might be at this point, but the election is still three months away and we have to be prepared.”

Biden’s team has been through clashes with Trump before — such as last fall, when the president laced into the former vice president’s son, Hunter, criticizing his work for a Ukrainian energy company. At the time, the campaign struggled to form a forceful response, paralyzed by indecision.

Since then, advisers and allies say, they have honed a playbook of sorts, reflecting a growing understanding of how to be nimble and challenge apresident who is capable of drawing significant attention to his slashing attacks.

The best approach, said Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, is, “kind of letting him flail around, but there’s always, within those tracks, opportunities to hit back. And I think they’ve been doing it.”

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.
This is probably a really good article
Sea Six is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2020, 2:22pm   #59
Sea Six
Barn Stall Owner #16A
Barn Stall Owner #16B

NCM Supporter '11,'13
Bantayan Kids '13
Points: 144,596, Level: 100
Activity: 4.3%
 
Sea Six's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: NW FL
Posts: 50,534
Thanks: 9,797
Thanked 12,475 Times in 7,090 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $602728
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff '79 View Post
I really don't care about your opinions of this article or its source.
This is EXACTLY what me and many fellow Americans, many of whom including me who voted for Trump, now feel.
You can talk up Trump til you're blue in the face, but he's out of my wheelhouse and no, I will not vote for him again.
btw... falsehoods means lies. If you read nothing, read the bolded part for the cliffs.

Have a nice read,

Over the course of 72 hours, President Donald Trump’s campaign accused Joe Biden of plagiarism. Trump warned that a Biden presidency would lead to a surge of crime in the streets. He tried to link his opponent to socialism and to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a leader of the Democratic left. And he said that Biden would eliminate the suburbs — and windows.

Facing weak poll numbers and criticism for failing to offer a second-term agenda or a cohesive case against Biden, the president is accelerating his attacks on his Democratic opponent — a sign of nervousness for any incumbent — as he looks for a way to turn the corner for his struggling candidacy. He has shaken up his campaign staff and intensified a tear-down operation aimed at Biden with a dizzying barrage of attacks, highlighted by dark, and at times misleading, television ads.

Deprived of his favored forum of raucous campaign rallies because of the coronavirus pandemic, Trump has road-tested his messages in the Rose Garden, at a staid appearance in Atlanta to announce rollbacks of environmental regulations and on Twitter, supplying an onslaught of scattershot and sometimes contradictory criticisms of the former vice president.

“It’s definitely a step in the right direction,” said Neil Newhouse, a Republican pollster. He noted that the contest had focused on the president’s record and conduct for months, and that the Trump campaign needed to begin “reminding people that this is a choice election, and beginning to frame up what that decision entails.”

Trump and his political team have tried new lines of attack before, including mocking Biden’s mental faculties, portraying him as corrupt and arguing that he is too cozy with China — none of which reversed Trump’s slide in the polls.

The president’s lack of discipline is a caution against any Republican hopes that this might be the start of a new chapter. The latest attacks on Biden may not work with undecided voters who have relatively positive views about him and his moderate political message, and are unhappy with Trump’s performance. The president's record of falsehoods, some strategists said, undercut his credibility with the American public over the past four years, and thus his ability to deliver effective criticism of Biden.

Aides to Trump said he has become increasingly aware of his peril and has leaned even more into the day-to-day operations of his campaign. The latest evidence of that was his decision Wednesday night to remove Brad Parscale as his campaign manager and to replace him with Bill Stepien, the deputy. Stepien is close to Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser, who has been put firmly at the helm of the reelection effort.

The new stance could represent a calculated effort by a campaign looking for a reset before it is too late. There is a long history of presidents using this period before Labor Day to set the framework of the race, and to negatively define their opponents; Trump has been under criticism from Republicans for his failure to do that.

The president’s actions this week drew some applause from Republicans who had grown despondent at the drift, and some party strategists expressed hope that this might one day be remembered as a turning point for Trump’s struggling campaign.

But there’s skepticism among Republicans and Democrats that Trump can reverse his troubled political trajectory. Beyond the overwhelming problems from the pandemic, the president lacks any kind of strategy to win over voters who are not already part of his right-wing base — or even, apparently, the will to do so — and his polarizing style has left him viewed unfavorably by much of the country, including in some traditionally Republican strongholds.

The broad and random nature of his attacks against Biden over the past few days suggest that Trump, unlike George H.W. Bush in 1988 and George W. Bush in 2004, has not engaged in the kind of methodical research that can identify the best lines of attack against an opponent. In Philadelphia this week, Trump ran television advertisements that accused Biden of both being soft on crime and being too tough on crime.

“If you go back to President Bush and President Obama, they effectively already had a bead on their opponent, a cleareyed strategy of what they were going to attack on, how they were going to frame it and how to make the election a binary choice,” said Rahm Emanuel, a Democrat who served as chief of staff to President Barack Obama and as mayor of Chicago. “That was a year and a half out. This is four months out. Trump is still trying to figure out how to get his handle on Joe Biden.”

Trump’s impulsive style of campaigning must be taken into account as well, strategists from both parties said.

“We shouldn’t overthink any of this as a strategy,” said Kevin Madden, who was a senior adviser to Mitt Romney, the Republican candidate for president in 2012. “It’s all the reflexive action of a candidate reacting to the hourly news cycle and trying to program it.”

Another indicator of Trump’s difficult path is the number of people who, in several polls, say the country is going in the right direction. That percentage is generally only in the high teens or just above 20%, numbers that reveal an unhappy electorate under Trump’s stewardship.

Trump’s newly intensified efforts to define Biden pose a strategic challenge to the Biden campaign in determining how — or if — to respond.

Biden’s aides and allies argued that Trump had so many vulnerabilities that he was limited in what kind of attacks he could make. They said they would be selective in deciding when to respond, looking for ways to advance their own message while trying to avoid elevating false claims.

“Donald Trump has spent his entire life depending on wild-eyed lies and asinine conspiracy theories to distract from his own failures and wrongdoing,” said Andrew Bates, a spokesman for Biden. “We starve Trump of the engagement that he wants and then pounce when he shows his underbelly.”

From this perspective, Trump has become so discredited with much of the American public that many of the attacks will come across as desperate.

“If you don’t know what sticks by now, it’s too late,” said Stephanie Cutter, a Democratic consultant who is helping to oversee the nominating convention for Biden. “When your opponent is throwing spaghetti to the wall to see what sticks, you don’t respond, you stick to your own strategy.”

“These attacks are not convincing for anybody on the fence,” she said. “For the Democratic base, and anybody on the fence who may have voted for Trump, these attacks are not what the race is about. It’s not about socialism, it’s not about defunding the police, it’s not about Bernie Sanders. It’s about moving this country away from the chaos and corruption of the last four years.”

But Democrats and Biden’s aides are well aware of the history of presidential candidates who ignored attacks they thought were specious and then lost the election — like John Kerry, in 2004, and Michael Dukakis, in 1988, both Democrats.

A claim that Biden supports efforts like those to defund the police, some Democrats said, could prove to be potent with at least a slice of voters and was worth watching, even though Biden has said repeatedly that he opposes defunding the police.

In recent weeks, two of Biden’s top advisers — Steve Ricchetti and Rep. Cedric Richmond of Louisiana — have set up Zoom meetings with Democratic congressional delegations in key battleground states. It’s an effort to open conversations with key leaders on the ground who can also serve as an early warning system if Trump’s attacks are getting traction, some participants said.

If necessary, Biden could move to rebut some of Trump’s attacks; he could also try to change the subject by mounting his new attacks on Trump, reflecting the adage in politics that a candidate who is defending is a candidate who is losing.

“They’re setting up very strong lines of communication,” said Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich. “If somebody does get worried, they’re hearing it, paying attention. They were really clear about that: They want to have those lines of communication open.”

Dingell said she has warned the Biden campaign that the Trump campaign’s most searing attacks cannot go unanswered.

“He is clearly playing ads that are wedge issues, and we have to be prepared to answer them, which we didn’t four years ago,” she said, pointing to trade, an issue of particular importance to autoworkers in her state. “We’re doing better than I thought we might be at this point, but the election is still three months away and we have to be prepared.”

Biden’s team has been through clashes with Trump before — such as last fall, when the president laced into the former vice president’s son, Hunter, criticizing his work for a Ukrainian energy company. At the time, the campaign struggled to form a forceful response, paralyzed by indecision.

Since then, advisers and allies say, they have honed a playbook of sorts, reflecting a growing understanding of how to be nimble and challenge apresident who is capable of drawing significant attention to his slashing attacks.

The best approach, said Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, is, “kind of letting him flail around, but there’s always, within those tracks, opportunities to hit back. And I think they’ve been doing it.”

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.
Jeff do you mind if I bookmark this and not ever get around to reading it later?
Sea Six is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2020, 2:22pm   #60
Sea Six
Barn Stall Owner #16A
Barn Stall Owner #16B

NCM Supporter '11,'13
Bantayan Kids '13
Points: 144,596, Level: 100
Activity: 4.3%
 
Sea Six's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: NW FL
Posts: 50,534
Thanks: 9,797
Thanked 12,475 Times in 7,090 Posts
Gameroom Barn Bucks: $602728
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff '79 View Post
I really don't care about your opinions of this article or its source.
This is EXACTLY what me and many fellow Americans, many of whom including me who voted for Trump, now feel.
You can talk up Trump til you're blue in the face, but he's out of my wheelhouse and no, I will not vote for him again.
btw... falsehoods means lies. If you read nothing, read the bolded part for the cliffs.

Have a nice read,

Over the course of 72 hours, President Donald Trump’s campaign accused Joe Biden of plagiarism. Trump warned that a Biden presidency would lead to a surge of crime in the streets. He tried to link his opponent to socialism and to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a leader of the Democratic left. And he said that Biden would eliminate the suburbs — and windows.

Facing weak poll numbers and criticism for failing to offer a second-term agenda or a cohesive case against Biden, the president is accelerating his attacks on his Democratic opponent — a sign of nervousness for any incumbent — as he looks for a way to turn the corner for his struggling candidacy. He has shaken up his campaign staff and intensified a tear-down operation aimed at Biden with a dizzying barrage of attacks, highlighted by dark, and at times misleading, television ads.

Deprived of his favored forum of raucous campaign rallies because of the coronavirus pandemic, Trump has road-tested his messages in the Rose Garden, at a staid appearance in Atlanta to announce rollbacks of environmental regulations and on Twitter, supplying an onslaught of scattershot and sometimes contradictory criticisms of the former vice president.

“It’s definitely a step in the right direction,” said Neil Newhouse, a Republican pollster. He noted that the contest had focused on the president’s record and conduct for months, and that the Trump campaign needed to begin “reminding people that this is a choice election, and beginning to frame up what that decision entails.”

Trump and his political team have tried new lines of attack before, including mocking Biden’s mental faculties, portraying him as corrupt and arguing that he is too cozy with China — none of which reversed Trump’s slide in the polls.

The president’s lack of discipline is a caution against any Republican hopes that this might be the start of a new chapter. The latest attacks on Biden may not work with undecided voters who have relatively positive views about him and his moderate political message, and are unhappy with Trump’s performance. The president's record of falsehoods, some strategists said, undercut his credibility with the American public over the past four years, and thus his ability to deliver effective criticism of Biden.

Aides to Trump said he has become increasingly aware of his peril and has leaned even more into the day-to-day operations of his campaign. The latest evidence of that was his decision Wednesday night to remove Brad Parscale as his campaign manager and to replace him with Bill Stepien, the deputy. Stepien is close to Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser, who has been put firmly at the helm of the reelection effort.

The new stance could represent a calculated effort by a campaign looking for a reset before it is too late. There is a long history of presidents using this period before Labor Day to set the framework of the race, and to negatively define their opponents; Trump has been under criticism from Republicans for his failure to do that.

The president’s actions this week drew some applause from Republicans who had grown despondent at the drift, and some party strategists expressed hope that this might one day be remembered as a turning point for Trump’s struggling campaign.

But there’s skepticism among Republicans and Democrats that Trump can reverse his troubled political trajectory. Beyond the overwhelming problems from the pandemic, the president lacks any kind of strategy to win over voters who are not already part of his right-wing base — or even, apparently, the will to do so — and his polarizing style has left him viewed unfavorably by much of the country, including in some traditionally Republican strongholds.

The broad and random nature of his attacks against Biden over the past few days suggest that Trump, unlike George H.W. Bush in 1988 and George W. Bush in 2004, has not engaged in the kind of methodical research that can identify the best lines of attack against an opponent. In Philadelphia this week, Trump ran television advertisements that accused Biden of both being soft on crime and being too tough on crime.

“If you go back to President Bush and President Obama, they effectively already had a bead on their opponent, a cleareyed strategy of what they were going to attack on, how they were going to frame it and how to make the election a binary choice,” said Rahm Emanuel, a Democrat who served as chief of staff to President Barack Obama and as mayor of Chicago. “That was a year and a half out. This is four months out. Trump is still trying to figure out how to get his handle on Joe Biden.”

Trump’s impulsive style of campaigning must be taken into account as well, strategists from both parties said.

“We shouldn’t overthink any of this as a strategy,” said Kevin Madden, who was a senior adviser to Mitt Romney, the Republican candidate for president in 2012. “It’s all the reflexive action of a candidate reacting to the hourly news cycle and trying to program it.”

Another indicator of Trump’s difficult path is the number of people who, in several polls, say the country is going in the right direction. That percentage is generally only in the high teens or just above 20%, numbers that reveal an unhappy electorate under Trump’s stewardship.

Trump’s newly intensified efforts to define Biden pose a strategic challenge to the Biden campaign in determining how — or if — to respond.

Biden’s aides and allies argued that Trump had so many vulnerabilities that he was limited in what kind of attacks he could make. They said they would be selective in deciding when to respond, looking for ways to advance their own message while trying to avoid elevating false claims.

“Donald Trump has spent his entire life depending on wild-eyed lies and asinine conspiracy theories to distract from his own failures and wrongdoing,” said Andrew Bates, a spokesman for Biden. “We starve Trump of the engagement that he wants and then pounce when he shows his underbelly.”

From this perspective, Trump has become so discredited with much of the American public that many of the attacks will come across as desperate.

“If you don’t know what sticks by now, it’s too late,” said Stephanie Cutter, a Democratic consultant who is helping to oversee the nominating convention for Biden. “When your opponent is throwing spaghetti to the wall to see what sticks, you don’t respond, you stick to your own strategy.”

“These attacks are not convincing for anybody on the fence,” she said. “For the Democratic base, and anybody on the fence who may have voted for Trump, these attacks are not what the race is about. It’s not about socialism, it’s not about defunding the police, it’s not about Bernie Sanders. It’s about moving this country away from the chaos and corruption of the last four years.”

But Democrats and Biden’s aides are well aware of the history of presidential candidates who ignored attacks they thought were specious and then lost the election — like John Kerry, in 2004, and Michael Dukakis, in 1988, both Democrats.

A claim that Biden supports efforts like those to defund the police, some Democrats said, could prove to be potent with at least a slice of voters and was worth watching, even though Biden has said repeatedly that he opposes defunding the police.

In recent weeks, two of Biden’s top advisers — Steve Ricchetti and Rep. Cedric Richmond of Louisiana — have set up Zoom meetings with Democratic congressional delegations in key battleground states. It’s an effort to open conversations with key leaders on the ground who can also serve as an early warning system if Trump’s attacks are getting traction, some participants said.

If necessary, Biden could move to rebut some of Trump’s attacks; he could also try to change the subject by mounting his new attacks on Trump, reflecting the adage in politics that a candidate who is defending is a candidate who is losing.

“They’re setting up very strong lines of communication,” said Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich. “If somebody does get worried, they’re hearing it, paying attention. They were really clear about that: They want to have those lines of communication open.”

Dingell said she has warned the Biden campaign that the Trump campaign’s most searing attacks cannot go unanswered.

“He is clearly playing ads that are wedge issues, and we have to be prepared to answer them, which we didn’t four years ago,” she said, pointing to trade, an issue of particular importance to autoworkers in her state. “We’re doing better than I thought we might be at this point, but the election is still three months away and we have to be prepared.”

Biden’s team has been through clashes with Trump before — such as last fall, when the president laced into the former vice president’s son, Hunter, criticizing his work for a Ukrainian energy company. At the time, the campaign struggled to form a forceful response, paralyzed by indecision.

Since then, advisers and allies say, they have honed a playbook of sorts, reflecting a growing understanding of how to be nimble and challenge apresident who is capable of drawing significant attention to his slashing attacks.

The best approach, said Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, is, “kind of letting him flail around, but there’s always, within those tracks, opportunities to hit back. And I think they’ve been doing it.”

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.
TTT


Sea Six is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

The Vette Barn > Off Topic/Babes/Other > Off Topic


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 5:15am.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © 2009 - 2020 The Vette Barn


Support the Barn:
 
Download the Mobile App;
 
Follow us on Facebook:

Become a Stall Owner

 

Apple iOS App        Google Android App

 

Visit our Facebook page